The Daily Talk
#81
(04-03-2014, 07:18 AM)Negrek Wrote: What have you got against parentheses? Don't you like parentheses?

Scheme's a language I've been wanting to learn for a long time, but I haven't really come across a project that I feel it's particularly suited for yet. Someday, though!

I don't like pulling multiple all-nighters in one week.

I've never had any qualms with parenthesis, but anything in high doses can be lethal, or at least sickening. From my experience, the syntax makes it hard to read scheme code. That, and MIT Scheme documentation is pretty awful, and the errors it gives are not very helpful.

We've only had a few weeks to learn scheme and then write a giant interpreter for it, so that's likely where my distaste for it comes from. That being said, we had less time for ML and it was easier to pick up.

It's worth learning a functional programming language. I wouldn't recommend MIT Scheme based on my own experiences, but there are other variants like Chicken and Racket, which might be better.

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Quote:Anyways, my dad's site finally got transferred to A Small Orange, which has a $35 per year plan that they call 'tiny'.

Ha ha, that's what my web site runs on. I remember I was going on about it to somebody on these forums previously; maybe that was you. Anyway, it should be way more than enough for a small business site. My site gets a couple dozen hits a day and I'm only using like 0.01% of my resource allocation--as long as you're not trying to serve some fancy dynamic application or have a huge image gallery or something it'll do just fine.
Hmm... I think I would have remembered if you had told me about it. I did some research for webhosts, and orange seemed like a good fit.

But I'm glad to hear that it works well for small sites. The site will only have a few pages with a few jpg images and some basic html5/css3, so it looks as though I made the right choice.


Quote:This fall I'm going to audit a course on modeling for biology and hopefully an AI class as well. I started the AI course before and it was super-cool, buuuuut also a little early in the morning, so it sort of ended up not happening. I'll get it this time! Might be teaching again, too; we'll see how that pans out.

Ah, AI. I really want to take that next year, though it will have to be in the spring for me. Apparently lisp is used for AI, so having scheme knowledge will actually be beneficial. xD
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#82
(04-03-2014, 07:43 AM)Isaac Wrote:
(04-03-2014, 07:18 AM)Negrek Wrote: What have you got against parentheses? Don't you like parentheses?

Scheme's a language I've been wanting to learn for a long time, but I haven't really come across a project that I feel it's particularly suited for yet. Someday, though!

I don't like pulling multiple all-nighters in one week.

I've never had any qualms with parenthesis, but anything in high doses can be lethal, or at least sickening. From my experience, the syntax makes it hard to read scheme code. That, and MIT Scheme documentation is pretty awful, and the errors it gives are not very helpful.

We've only had a few weeks to learn scheme and then write a giant interpreter for it, so that's likely where my distaste for it comes from. That being said, we had less time for ML and it was easier to pick up.

It's worth learning a functional programming language. I wouldn't recommend MIT Scheme based on my own experiences, but there are other variants like Chicken and Racket, which might be better.

Just to interject back into the thread, but... half the stuff you said Issac doesn't make any sense to me. o.0 I understand that you are talking computer-speak and the spoiler looks like some sort of code for programming or commands and you call it a language, but that's about it. As for the others (Chicken/Racket/ML?), I don't even know what those are! Will these be things I might learn as I continue in my degree path? And what's a syntax and how do you make an "interpreter" for something?
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#83
(04-08-2014, 03:23 PM)Kaelyn Wrote: And what's a syntax and how do you make an "interpreter" for something?
Not sure what an interpreter is, but syntax is how a language should look when it's written correctly. Like for Java, function(), et cetera. (That may be inaccurate; Java's not really my bag.)
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#84
Quote:As for the others (Chicken/Racket/ML?), I don't even know what those are! Will these be things I might learn as I continue in my degree path? And what's a syntax and how do you make an "interpreter" for something?

He's talking about the programming language Scheme. Chicken, Racket, and several others are dialects of Scheme. They're just like the dialects of human languages (like New York American English vs Southern American English); they have the same basic structure, but they have some different idioms and constructions. (FWIW, Guile Scheme is what I would be interested in learning, specifically, purely because it has the most badass name of any programming language out there and that's obviously the most important criterion for deciding.)

"Syntax" refers to the languages governing how to generate sentences in any particular language, including a computer language. In terms of human language, the syntax of English is different than that of Spanish in that in English you put the adjective before the noun it's modifying ("blue lake"), whereas in Spanish it goes after instead ("lake blue"). Similarly, programming languages have different rules about what constitutes valid code; those rules constitute their syntax.

Programming languages are used to communicate with computers. However, computers don't actually speak Scheme, or Java, or any other human-readable language; what they actually "understand" is bytecode, strings of ones and zeros that correspond to actual changes in electrical current inside the computer. Strings of ones and zeros are kind of a pain for humans to generate and work with, so we create programming languages that are at least a little friendlier for us. Some of these languages are what we call compiled languages because there's a special program called a "compiler" that takes a file written in the language of your choice and converts it to a big string of ones and zeros--the program the computer will actually execute. Java, C, and C++ are examples of compiled languages.

On the other hand, some programming languages are interpreted languages. Rather than (or in addition to) using a compiler, these languages rely on a program called an "interpreter" that, like an interpreter for human languages, acts as a go-between for the human-readable code and the machine-readable code the computer will actually use. It reads the program you've put together and translates it into machine commands that are then executed. Interpreted languages are generally slower than compiled languages because of the added overhead of the translation steps; compiled languages only have to be compiled once and then can be run as pure machine code from then on our. Python, Ruby, Haskell, and Scheme are examples of interpreted languages.

Therefore all you need to do to create your own programming language is to come up with some syntax that you like and write a program that can translate from that syntax into machine language--generally that program will take the form of an interpreter. This is a common project assignment for courses on computer languages, but you won't necessarily encounter it if you're focusing more on the applied aspects of software engineering. You also might not learn the specific language Scheme while working on your degree (it's fairly uncommon outside of some specialized fields), but you will certainly learn at least one other language and probably some of the theoretical stuff about interpreters etc. even if you don't write one.
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#85
Wow. Thank-you very much Majora, and definitely Negrek. That's a lot of information. The only thing I knew about bytecode (aka binary code?) is that it is 0's and 1's and that it meant a "high frequency" and a "low frequency". ^^() I think I understand a bit more. So, again, thank-you very much. ^^
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#86
(04-09-2014, 09:36 AM)Kaelyn Wrote: Wow. Thank-you very much Majora, and definitely Negrek. That's a lot of information. The only thing I knew about bytecode (aka binary code?) is that it is 0's and 1's and that it meant a "high frequency" and a "low frequency". ^^() I think I understand a bit more. So, again, thank-you very much. ^^

Bytecode, to the best of my knowledge, is used by languages with virtual machines like Java. A virtual machine is kinda like an interpreter, except it handles the compiled bytecode rather than the written source code. In Java specifically, the compiler takes Java code and translates it into bytecode, which is then used by the Java Virtual Machine to execute commands.

The whole point of bytecode is to give a programming language portability. You can download the Java Virtual Machine for every common OS available currently, and the code that you write on a Windows machine will run on Mac OS and Linux Distributions simply because the bytecode is interpreted the same way each time regardless of the OS. This is Java's greatest advantage to C++, which makes porting code a huge pain especially if you are using custom libraries, or are switching compilers. C++ is not compiled into bytecode - the resulting file can be executed on its own. Bytecode is (generally) slower than a directly compiled program, but (generally) faster than an interpreter.

On the other hand, binary code is direct communication to the machine, usually called machine code. Bytecode and machine code are both represented in 1's and 0's, but machine code is direct hardware dependent communication, whereas bytecode is interpreted by a program. Neither one is friendly to the human eye, which is why we use higher level languages (and assembly) to make life easier.

By the way, we should totally start a programming thread.
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#87
/bumps thread yet again

How's everyone doing? I know right now is finals time for some of you, which sucks. I have my exams next month, which will be hell, but I'd rather wait to deal with that when it happens. I don't like to think about it.

/shudders

Anyway, for now, I'm stuck doing a lame science project. I thought I had at last slain le grand et puissant roi de la science, but apparently not. I'm stuck doing some stupid project that will contribute nothing to the world accept about eight hours of my wasted time, doing some sort of stupid experiment that will prove that people play video games better after eating or something equally pointless.

I've been writing a lot lately, but you probably don't want to hear about that; I also wrote a program that creates random Pesterchum handles. I'm trying to put it in a more competent language for webpages, but in the interim I'm stuck with Python (I might try out Brython later on). Some interesting outcomes of said program have been maliciousPastor, automaticEggnog, extraordinaryFetus, and unbeltedNut.
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#88
/bursts in

In January, my school's theater club did Romeo and Juliet; thing is, that's supposed to be last semester's play. In the remaining time from then and now, we managed to pick and completely rehearse A Chorus Line. It's a beautiful play (go listen to What I Did For Love), and we start this Thursday, all the way to Saturday. What's really sad it's that it's the senior class actors' last play, and they're really cool people.

And the school year's winding down! I'm kinda sad. I really liked most of my classes, and the HS clubs are just spectacular. I gave up on my crush, went to a couple of quinceañeras (I'm Puerto Rican, we celebrate either those or sweet sixteens), and just generally had an awesome time. I'm thinking of running for a directive position in Theater Club, too. All in all, high school is shaping up to be kickass.
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#89
I've just finished school. I have an English exam tomorrow, but really that's not even an object at all. I passed Geometry with a B. I'm so relieved to be done with all of this!
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#90
Romeo and Juliet is a terrible, idiot plot based story. Bleaugh. You should do Macbeth, that one's awesome. And it doesn't have to rely entirely on contrived coincidences and sheer stupitiy!

I'm not in school at the moment (yay!) since I'm waiting until September before going back to England to study at uni. I'll be returning to Canada during summers, then leaving England for good (seriously, my country is terrible).

Personally, I find hard science (not the social science type thing you had to do) and maths to be totally awesome, but English? Oh god, keep those exams away from me. I HATED my GCSE's since, annoyingly, the Language exam (y'know, the one that's supposed to be testing your grasp of the English language) has, to my mind, too little a number of points for decent spelling and grammar and focused too much on analysing pieces of work, which is LITERATURE. Something that has a whole other exam for! And you know that the NATIVE knowledge of a language is terrible when the English teacher says, as if it's a good thing, that the lit exam is easier because you don't have to focus on spelling and grammar. In other words, it's fine to not be able to read and write well enough to get on in the world, so long as you can analyse some terrible poetry and Shakespeare's worst plays. *headdesk*

I could complain for ages about this.
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#91
Macbeth is really great, though Hamlet is simply the best. I really would like to read more Shakespeare, since I tend to like his characters and stories a lot.

But yeah... hooray for Summer. My motivation is at an all time low, and I won't have much time as soon as work starts for me. Sill have to finish my dad's website, and do a bunch of school prep for next year. But at least I've managed to uphold my lifting schedule, which is one less goal for me to accomplish.
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#92
Has this thread seriously been ignored since May? Allow me to revive it.

I have been absent from forum activity for a long time now. In the time I've spent away from this place, I have declared myself a dual major student, focusing on Homeland Security and Computer Information Systems. I am attempting to create a cyber security career for myself. I feel it's a rich market given how today's business world functions. If anything there are multiple government jobs related to this field, situated around the country, but I'd like to focus on the private business sector. I've also found an innate ability to write A papers. I'm taking a Writing Seminar course and I've been able to impress the professor. Makes me want to explore more into writing, maybe take something like English as a minor. I enjoy writing, I used to write fan fiction on here.

Aside from school, my family is doing very well. Abigail has a great job in Lexington and Jared will be 3 in January! I'm still living in Kentucky, and I really like it here. Weather is actually pretty good, though it does change pretty fast. Yesterday it was clear skies and 80, but Saturday is supposed to be 48 and dreary.

So...how have your lives been?
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#93
It's good to hear that you're doing well Skyler. It's impressive to be able to balance school and a family, and you seem to be managing both nicely.

As for me, I'm all over the place. I've had a ridiculous semester, and I'm surprised that I've survived it thus far. I put myself into a bad combination of classes, and I haven't been able to keep up in some of my classes.

My schedule was this at the beginning of the semester: Quantum Physics, Assembly Language, Intro Neuroscience, Intro Chemistry and Intro Japanese. It wasn't entirely infeasible (in theory), but Quantum in particular was stressing me out because I couldn't wrap my brain around the concepts. I've become famous in the Physics department for dropping the course in the middle of an exam, which was a great move on my part, but I should have made that decision a bit earlier.

Even with the four remaining classes, my life is hectic. Japanese, Neuro and Chem are all exam based, and I've pretty much spent the past seven weeks frantically jumping from test to test. It's horribly stressful and I don't do as well when I'm constantly in "exam crisis mode". The large assembly projects I have to do for my fourth class aren't helping my case either. There have been weeks where my roommate claims he didn't see me at all because I slept in academic buildings for consecutive days, and my sleep schedule in general is kinda crazy.

And to add on to this misery, I've been having trouble waking up in time for my 9am classes. I have missed a bunch of chem lectures, and two neuro lectures, and making up the content for those two classes in particular is back-breaking.

My semester started getting messed up when I got sick in the third week. It was only a cold, but a particularly bad one, and I got it right after a bunch of exams and right before my Quantum exam. Needless to say, I stayed up late against my better judgement to study for it, and all that came out of it was a dropped class and my health further deteriorating.

...so I hope I've managed to make my life sound completely horrible, and if that's the case, I shall now collect my official Drama Queen award. But aside from feeling miserable, things haven't been terrible. It looks like I'm doing better academically this semester than the last, which is great because I have a long way to go before my GPA is where I want it to be for graduation.

I will be ecstatic when this semester is finally over. I've decided that Intro Chem will be my last chemistry class during my undergraduate years (though I'll eventually have to take organic chem in the future anyway), and I'll be shifting from a bunch of pure memorization classes to more practical skills classes, which is great because I suck at memorizing things.

Whew, that felt good. I hope the rest of you are doing significantly better than I am. xD
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#94
Since school seems to be the topic of choice here, I might as well post about how mine is going.
How is it going? It's over. As of today I am officially a high school graduate. I had my prizegiving today, and I won first in Japanese to the surprise of no-one (I've won it every year since 2011, but to be fair the class size is really small, only three students this year including myself). Of course, I do still have my final exams to worry about, especially my scholarship ones, but the fact remains that I have officially finished my final year at high school. Now that I'm done there, the question becomes if I have any plans for the life outside. The answer is, I do. Next year I'll be spending 5 months on exchange in Japan. I don't know exactly where yet, but I'm confident that it will be a lot of fun, and definitely an experience I'll never forget.
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#95
(11-04-2014, 02:15 AM)Eonrider Wrote: Since school seems to be the topic of choice here, I might as well post about how mine is going.
How is it going? It's over. As of today I am officially a high school graduate. I had my prizegiving today, and I won first in Japanese to the surprise of no-one (I've won it every year since 2011, but to be fair the class size is really small, only three students this year including myself). Of course, I do still have my final exams to worry about, especially my scholarship ones, but the fact remains that I have officially finished my final year at high school. Now that I'm done there, the question becomes if I have any plans for the life outside. The answer is, I do. Next year I'll be spending 5 months on exchange in Japan. I don't know exactly where yet, but I'm confident that it will be a lot of fun, and definitely an experience I'll never forget.

Aw man, I'm so jealous. I wish I could go to Japan for a few months, but at this point, it appears impossible. There's simply not enough time for me to study abroad with a major in computer science, unfortunately. I'll have to go after I graduate, which is far less likely to even happen.

So, what do you plan on doing with Japanese? Will you be going to college after your exchange experience in Japan?
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#96
I'm not really sure what I plan on doing with Japanese. I've been studying it for 4 and a half years now, but I don't see myself in a career based around it. I'll be studying it at uni/college if I can, but it won't be my major. I've already decided on my major, it's going to be astronomy, something I've been passionate about from a very young age. This means I'll have to go to uni in the other island of New Zealand, though, since there's only one university here that offers astronomy, which is going to add a lot of pressure and expense. Nonetheless I'm still really looking forward to it, and after spending so long not knowing where I was going, it's great to have a solid plan for the next few years.
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#97
そですか。 Good to see you know where you're heading and what you want to do. Some of my friends (all college sophomores), still have no idea what they want to do with themselves.

I definitely want to continue Japanese since I'm enjoying it thus far, and I'd like to somehow make it relevant to what I want to do after I graduate. I'm considering taking a summer off of my internship to study abroad in Japan, which will hopefully help me figure out some of my long term goals. What I know for sure is that I want to get out of the U.S. and live somewhere else for a while - and that somewhere else could be Japan, Germany, maybe even France. But I don't know what my options are at this point, so there's no point in thinking about it too deeply.

I'm also starting to realize that I want to explore linguistics a bit. I've never really considered going into it at all, but I am personally fascinated by languages of all forms (spoken, written/visual, and of course, computer languages!) , and the topic is highly relevant to some other fields that I'm interested in - namely neuroscience and computer science.

Perhaps I should look into Computational Neurolinguistics? Even better than Computational Neuroscience, right? The longer the name, the bigger the ego.
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#98
It would definitely be an excellent field to enter. As technology advances further into the future, our world will only grow closer as globalization increases. It'd be interesting, exciting, and there'd be plenty of careers to pursue in multiple regions of the globe!

I've got ambitions to move my family to Washington DC once I complete my education here in Kentucky. However, the longer we stay, the more roots we will plant. By the time I complete both of my degrees, Jared will be 7. Who knows what career paths or college options Abigail may pursue? There are 3 colleges right out the door for her to choose! I'm just not sure where our future lies. I'm going to have to hold my dreams down for the sake of family. If we grow out roots and love our home here, we'll stay. If we can uproot and settle back down with ease, we may do it.

Steering away from school and life decisions, I'm so excited now that it's November. I'm going to be grabbing a PS4, some of the awesome games that are out on it, ORAS, and take three weeks off in December. My holiday is going to be so well deserved and relaxing! I'm so excited about ORAS, and I want to try out the new Call of Duty. I've also heard Destiny is really good. Thank goodness for long college winter breaks!
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#99
Buuuump!

So... Winter Break, huh? Let's... break the ice... with some generic questions!
  1. What are your holiday plans?
  2. If you are a student, how was your fall semester?
  3. How's the weather up/down there?
  4. On a scale of 10 to 10, how happy are you to be on break?

I'll start things off...

1. I'm not doing much exciting this break. I will be working full time for the first three weeks in January, at the engineering company I intern at during Summers. Otherwise, forums, video games, artistic endeavors, programming, working out, and the basic metabolic processes. Christmas is very low-key here - I already know I'm getting an electric kettle under the tree, and probably not much else. There will be a family party afterwards, and I'll do my best to skip church. That's about it.

2. School was miserable. I caught a really bad cold in the first month, had to drop my 5th class, and dragged my heels through the rest of the semester. Every week was a major exam week (for eight weeks straight - I counted), and it was a struggle tackling each one as it came. But... I feel like I did fine. This will hopefully have been my best semester of college in regards to grades and gained knowledge. My CS class was my favorite so far, and starting Japanese was an enjoyable experience. I won't be taking a Chem class for a long time though.

3. The weather's nice, actually. No snow, but I'm not complaining. It's better that way for me, since I'll be driving 1.5 hrs everyday starting next week. I hope it stays this way.

4. Definitely a 10.
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1. Firstly, get Christmas out of the way. Then do my Learn-comm and programming coursework (I've been procrastinating). Then back to uni. -_-

2. Very easy work, but then my laziness bit my rear and I had to rush to sort coursework due in for the Friday before term end.
Of course, I do have two actual semesters at Loughborough, first semester finishes shortly after we get back and have finished our exams.

3. Cold and snowless, frequently wet. I'd rather have snow, thanks. I'm not leaving the house.

4. 11! Actually 9, I could do without the coursework...and smaller, more cuddleable dogs...and less of the occasional bigotry from my grandparents...
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